Category: Heritage

The Kensington Runestone Museum

By Solwyn AOR

The Kensington Runestone Museum is located in Alexandria, Minnesota. It is a small museum with an inside and outside display. The outbuildings are transplanted original dwellings donated by the current owners of various properties in the state of Minnesota. They present a small snapshot of how our folk would have lived in Scandinavia, and other parts of Northern Europe. Continue reading

February 7, 2013 | 0 Comments More

“Le Cliot de Tsèrafouén” – The Hollow Of Fairies

By Hariulf OR Here is a beautiful legend from my land. This is not really “Odinic” but it’s interesting because it shows that despite the Christianization of the folk, the belief in the invisible world has never completely disappeared. In … Continue reading

December 17, 2012 | 0 Comments More

In the Footsteps of Offa

This brand new film from OR Media traces the 23 mile section of the Offa’s Dyke Path between the Anglo-Saxon town of Kington and the village of Newcastle. Continue reading

September 2, 2012 | 0 Comments More
The myth of William Tell

The myth of William Tell

By Hariulf OR

First of all this article is not really an Odinic article, but I would like to share with you a very important myth for Switzerland. The very interesting thing with this myth is that it is very close to two other myths of Germanic lore: Toko’s story reported by Saxo Grammaticus and the Dietrich von Bern/Thidrek’s saga. Continue reading

March 30, 2011 | 0 Comments More

The Legend of the Edelweiss

The Edelweiss is one of the symbols of Switzerland, and also of other alpine countries such as Austria. It is a rare flower that grows at high altitudes. The Edelweiss has therefore given rise to many legends. This is one of my favourites Continue reading

June 3, 2009 | 10 Comments More

Language of the Gods

Icelandic or Old Norse has come to be regarded in some Odinist circles as a kind of holy language. Just as Victorian clerks were wont to scatter Latin phrases throughout their writing and never used a plain word when a more obscure one could be found so some latter-day Odinists will often not use an English word in their rituals when they can find an Icelandic word that will do. It matters not that few of their fellow Odinists (sometimes even the user himself) do not understand. The user of language has made his point and others must wallow in ignorance, for some will be too intimidated to say, “Hey, what does all that mean?” Continue reading

November 29, 2008 | 0 Comments More