Tag: anglo saxon

John Barleycorn Must Die

John Barleycorn Must Die

By Reginhard OR

John Barleycorn is a character in English folksong and is a personification of barley and more importantly of the beer made from it. In the song he is subjected to a number of assaults which correspond to the harvest milling and brewing of beer. John Barleycorn encounters great suffering and death so that others may benefit. Continue reading

September 28, 2012 More

Time to Honour an Unsung Hero – Hoskuld CG

By Heimgest DCG

Thankfully our folk also have many heroes from the past who not only can inspire us today but also give us a sense of who we are. It is for this reason that many modern state operated educational establishments (or so called educational establishments) no longer teach the history of our people. The New Awakening is at a stage now where we also have heroes from the much more recent past– truly Odinic heroes and heroines who have dedicated themselves to the restoration of our ancestral way. Continue reading

January 1, 2011 More
The Yule Tower, Heart(h) of the Northern World.

The Yule Tower, Heart(h) of the Northern World.

By Arnbald OR-B & FS (Brittany & French Saxony)

For many Odinists today, the Yule tower (Julleuchter) appears as one of the main cultual artefacts in the family hof. As its names suggests, it is mainly involved in the Yule time celebrations. If it has became an important symbol of the old faith, the artefact itself – as we shall see – not necessarily an old symbol. Continue reading

December 1, 2010 More

A Reply to Charlemagne

MOST of us are familiar with the Saxon Oath of Renunciation which Charlemagne, Kaiser Karl, forced upon our Folk with the blessing of the Roman church. Among his many atrocities he destroyed our great religious centre, the Irminsul, in the year 772 and conducted mass baptism of POWs by force, even clubbing unconscious those who rightly objected. Those who continued to resist his Oath and still served the ancient gods of their fathers, lost their homes, their property and often their lives.
Here now is my ritual response to all of this outrageous mummery, in which I have tried to use an entirely Germanic vocabulary, with no Mediterranean words (apart from ‘prophet’ and ‘saint’): Continue reading

August 19, 2009 More